Finding Your Voice through Podcasting

C7-DMRzVYAAvd6r

While podcasting takes time and preparation and may have a steep learning curve, it is very rewarding. Research interests come alive in a new way when you create and share your ideas via podcasting. Listener responses will help you develop your ideas in new directions. Podcasting also breaks down academia’s walls, creating a wider audience and inviting the public to see what scholars do and why it matters.

Alison Innes “Finding  Your Voice through PodcastingSociety for Classical Studies Blog. 15 May 2017.

My post on podcasting for the Society for Classical Studies went live today! You can read it in full here.

Advertisements

Podcasting in Classics: Thoughts on the Current Conversation

It is certainly exciting times for social media in academics, as the current discussion about podcasting in Classics demonstrates.

As Hannah Čulík-Baird shows in her blog post this past week, conversations about Classics outreach and podcasting at this year’s annual meeting of the Society for Classical Studies (SCS) show that the discipline is starting to recognize the power of social media and its importance for the continued survival and growth of Classics.

Podcasting in particular is huge right now. A quick Google search will show a plethora of articles and statistics on its popularity. More people than ever before are listening to and producing podcasts. Now is the time for the discipline to capitalize on this particular social media platform. The social media landscape can change swiftly and timing is an important part of success.


The suggestion was made on Twitter that the SCS could support podcasting efforts by keeping a list on their website of Classics podcasters. As an independent podcaster, I have mixed feelings about this. I certainly welcome support and the idea of having a list to make it easier to find Classics podcasting is definitely useful and appealing.

But while lists are helpful tools to finding information, they need to be done carefully; a list can easily become (or be perceived as) a gate-keeping device. How broadly do we define Classics in terms of geography, time period, etc, for this list? How much of a podcast needs to be about Classics material to be considered for such a list? David Meadows (@RogueClassicists) has clearly considered some of these questions in his list he released today, but these questions do need to be borne in mind to prevent gate-keeping.

img_1218

 

Having said that, there are some excellent lists out there. As mentioned, David Meadows (@RogueClassicist) has undertaken the monumental task and produced a fantastic list here. Ryan Stitt of The History of Ancient Greece Podcast maintains an excellent list on his website. There is also the Digital Classicist Wiki, which has a list of Classical Studies podcasts (including video). The nascent #HumanitiesPodcasts network on Twitter (@HumCommCasters) includes some excellent Classics and Classics-related podcasts (including ancient Egypt) as well. I keep a running list on the MythTake blog here and Ray Belli of Words for Granted also has a list here. Chris Francese, who spoke on the outreach panel at the SCS, has this Classics podcast list (which can also be found here).

Bear in mind, of course, that with the rapidly nature of social media, there will never be a fully complete list. New podcasts will (hopefully) be always springing up while others may fade away.

The most important support academic organizations like SCS can offer to academic podcasters is perhaps offering small grants to independent podcasters who, by nature of being outside the university system, do not have access to other funding to defray costs. We do not get into podcasting to make money, but the reality is that our projects, which are of benefit to the discipline, have costs.

While it is cheap and easy to start in podcasting, to continue for any length of time and to produce a quality product, investment of time and funds is necessary. Equipment is an obvious expense; A good, basic podcasting microphone, for example, is easily $100 (Canadian funds).

Podcasts need to be hosted online someplace, and hosting services are businesses. Free plans may suffice for a few episodes, but are quickly outgrown. Plan costs vary by service, by storage amount, and by bandwidth. At the time we set up MythTake, for example, the cheapest plan I found was $60 a year; 18 episodes in, we have hit our storage limit. We are now in the position of having to remove older episodes to make room for new, which is far from ideal.

Website hosting is also another financial consideration. Again, free services may work in some situations, but at some point the podcast is going to need it’s own URL for marketing and promotion.

An informal survey of a few #HumanitiesPodcasts members suggests that between equipment and hosting services, a podcaster might spend anywhere from $200 to $500 a year. Some podcasters use Patreon, with varying success, to defray costs.

The investment of time that podcasters put into our work shouldn’t be overlooked, either. We do our podcasts because we love our subject and we want to share our passion and enthusiasm with others. But it does take time, and I think it’s important to recognize that. Depending on the show format (scripted vs conversational, for example), researching, recording, producing, and promoting might take as much as 10-15 hours per episode. And, as one podcaster pointed out, that is on top of the years of university training we’ve already done!

We podcast out of passion, a desire to stay connected with our material, and a desire to share our subject with the public. Providing small financial resources to defray expenses would send a very powerful message about an organization’s commitment to non-traditional scholarship and actively demonstrate a desire to bring non-traditional scholars on the fringes into the community.

Individuals Classicists also have a role to play in supporting the podcasting community.

The most obvious and perhaps the most simple is simply listening to podcasts and providing supportive feedback. Rating a podcast on iTunes may not seem like much, but iTunes search results are based on podcast ratings: the more highly rated a podcast, the more likely it will turn up near the top of the search. Recommending podcasts to peers and students is also very important.

A more innovative approach, which I have been investigating recently, is incorporating podcasts into students’ learning experience. There are already great podcasts out there about ancient history, archaeology, myth, and literature that would make great assigned listening to replace or supplement student textbooks. There is not only pedagogical value in this, but it also shows our students that Classics is relevant, current, and accessible. The podcasters’ enthusiasm for their subjects comes through in a way that it can’t in a textbook, and the literature we study was experienced by its ancient audience aurally, anyway. Podcasting and video casting is closer to the Ancient Greek experience of literature than reading. (I plan to write more about this in a future post; If you are already doing something like this, please get in touch!)

Those of us at the fringes, who are doing our academics independently through social media, have much to offer the traditional scholarly community. We are already on the front lines of humcomm–sharing the diversity and relevancy of humanities with the public and engaging them in conversation. This work is critical to the discipline’s survival and growth, so our voices need to be a part of this conversation. The SCS’ conversation about supporting social media efforts within the Classics displine will be most fruitful and most effective when non-traditional social media scholars have a seat at the table.

mythtake is moving!

img_6482

Exciting news! Somebody left a shiny new blog under our Christmas tree and now mythtake podcast now has a home of its own!

http://mythtake.blog

Existing posts will be copied over to the new blog and copies will stay here so you can still find them.

Bookmark the new site to keep up with new episodes, but don’t abandon this one altogether! I’ll be writing here about academics, social media, creativity, and whatever else strikes my fancy. My blog will be a sort of research journal, where I work out ideas for my various projects, and I hope that you will continue to follow along!

mythtake episode 16 heroes at home: helen of troy

img_6482

We continue our look at heroes at home with the woman who needs no introduction, the (in)famous Helen of Troy.

https://www.podbean.com/media/player/mdacv-654060?from=yiiadmin

Download this episode (right click and save)


Source Passages

Euripides’ Trojan Women lines 914-965.


Translation Sources

Euripides. Trojan Women. Translated by Diskin Clay. Focus, 2005.


Join us on Twitter @InnesAlison and @darrinsunstrum

We’re now on Facebook! Give us a like, let us know what you think, and follow along at MythTake.

Join us on Twitter @InnesAlison and @darrinsunstrum

We’re now on Facebook! Give us a like, let us know what you think, and follow along at MythTake.

Subscribe on iTunes or Google Play so you don’t miss an episode! Find our RSS on Podbean.

This week’s theme music: “Super Hero” by King Louie’s Missing Monuments from the album “Live at WFMU” (2011). Used under Creative Commons license. Music used under Creative Commons license and available from Free Music Archive.

mythtake episode 15 heroes at home: heracles and megara

img_6482Join our informal discussion on heroes of the home! Tonight we chat about Megara, the first wife of Heracles, from Euripides’ Heracles.

https://www.podbean.com/media/player/zvvbk-649d57?from=yiiadmin

Download this episode (right click and save)


Source Passages

Euripides Heracles 275-311, 516-561.


Translation Sources

Euripides. Heracles. Translated by Michael R. Halleran. Focus Classical Library. 1988.


Shout Outs & Notes

Ellie Mackin “Odysseus doesn’t go to the Underworld in the Nekyia, peeps!” Blog post.


Join us on Twitter @InnesAlison and @darrinsunstrum

We’re now on Facebook! Give us a like, let us know what you think, and follow along at MythTake.

Subscribe on iTunes or Google Play so you don’t miss an episode! Find our RSS on Podbean.

This week’s theme music: “Super Hero” by King Louie’s Missing Monuments from the album “Live at WFMU” (2011). Used under Creative Commons license. Music used under Creative Commons license and available from Free Music Archive.

mythtake episode 14 Hallowe’en Special: Necromancy in Greek Mythology

img_6482C’est l’Hallowe’en! We have a special spooky episode for you this week: two episodes of necromancy from Greek mythology! Follow the spell-binding details (haha!) of Odysseus’ encounter with the dead and Jason’s summoning of Hekate in Argonautika.

Have a safe and spooktacular Hallowe’en!

https://www.podbean.com/media/player/d77kq-6414dc?from=yiiadmin

Download this episode (right click and save)


Source Passages

Odyssey 11.13-50

Arognautika 3.1026-1049, 1194-1224


Translation Sources

Apollonios Rhodios. Argonautika. Trans. Peter Green. University of California, 2007.

Homer. Odyssey. Trans. Richmond Lattimore. Harper Perennial Classics, 1967.


Shout Outs & Notes

Listener mail from @EllieMackin–you should follow her!


Join us on Twitter @InnesAlison and @darrinsunstrum

We’re now on Facebook! Give us a like, let us know what you think, and follow along at MythTake.

Subscribe on iTunes so you don’t miss an episode!

Subscribe on Google Play 

Find our RSS on Podbean

This week’s theme music: “Super Hero” by King Louie’s Missing Monuments from the album “Live at WFMU” (2011). Used under Creative Commons license. Music used under Creative Commons license and available from Free Music Archive.

mythtake episode 13 mythological tour of the solar system: ceres/demeter

img_6482Our last stop on our mythological tour of the solar system is the dwarf planet Ceres! We take a look at the Greek goddess Demeter, who is anything but insignificant!

(I can’t believe we’ve made it through 13 episodes and you guys are still listening. Thanks!)

https://www.podbean.com/media/player/tkjqc-638eea?from=yiiadmin

Download this episode (right click and save)


Source Passages

Homeric Hymn to Demeter 90-104, 233-280, 440-495


Translation Sources

Homeric Hymns. Trans. Susan Shelmerdine. Newburyport MA: Focus Publishing, 1995. Print.


Selected Sources

NASA. “Ceres” http://solarsystem.nasa.gov/planets/ceres


Join us on Twitter @InnesAlison and @darrinsunstrum

We’re now on Facebook! Give us a like, let us know what you think, and follow along at MythTake.

Subscribe on iTunes so you don’t miss an episode! https://itunes.apple.com/ca/podcast/mythtake/id1103569489?mt=2

Google Play https://goo.gl/app/playmusic?ibi=com.google.PlayMusic&isi=691797987&ius=googleplaymusic&link=https://play.google.com/music/m/Iaegzaquhc7lfvc24icrzardzmu?t%3DMythTake

Find our RSS on Podbean http://alisoninnes.podbean.com

This week’s theme music: “Super Hero” by King Louie’s Missing Monuments from the album “Live at WFMU” (2011). Used under Creative Commons license. Music used under Creative Commons license and available from Free Music Archive.

mythtake episode 12 mythological tour of the solar system 9: pluto/hades

img_6482

Welcome to episode 12! Our apologies for being more than a little late getting the blog post up, but here it is at last.

This episode, we delve into the mysterious world of Hades. This Greek god of the underworld is also associated with wealth and the Roman god Pluto. There aren’t a lot of myths about Hades but we can learn a lot from his appearance in Homeric Hymn to Demeter.

https://www.podbean.com/media/player/37m94-626e67?from=yiiadmin

Download this episode (right click and save)


Source Passages

Homeric Hymn to Demeter 1-23; 334-385.


Translation Sources

Homeric Hymns. Trans. Susan Shelmerdine. Newburyport MA: Focus Publishing, 1995. Print.


Selected Sources

NASA. “Pluto: King of the Kuiper Belt” http://solarsystem.nasa.gov/planets/pluto


Shout Outs & Notes

We highly recommend listening to The Endless Knot episode on Pluto. Sarah and Mark provide a great discussion of the origin of the god Pluto. You can subscribe to their podcast through iTunes.


Join us on Twitter @InnesAlison and @darrinsunstrum

Subscribe on iTunes so you don’t miss an episode! https://itunes.apple.com/ca/podcast/mythtake/id1103569489?mt=2

Google Play https://goo.gl/app/playmusic?ibi=com.google.PlayMusic&isi=691797987&ius=googleplaymusic&link=https://play.google.com/music/m/Iaegzaquhc7lfvc24icrzardzmu?t%3DMythTake

Find our RSS on Podbean http://alisoninnes.podbean.com

This week’s theme music: “Super Hero” by King Louie’s Missing Monuments from the album “Live at WFMU” (2011). Used under Creative Commons license. Music used under Creative Commons license and available from Free Music Archive.

mythtake episode 11 mythological tour of the solar system 8: neptune/poseidon

Poseidon

“The Artemision Bronze, a bronze statue of deity, either Poseidon or Zeus, about to hurl a missing projectile (either a thunderbolt, if Zeus, or a trident if Poseidon). Height: 2.1 m. ca. 460 BC. Found in shipwreck off Cape Artemisium. Athens National Archaeological Museum.” https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sounion#/media/File:Poseidon.jpg

img_6482

We travel to that last of the gas giants, Neptune, and learn about Poseidon. This Greek god of the sea, earthquakes, and horses is brother to Zeus (Jupiter) and has a mind of his own when it comes to the Trojan War.

 

https://www.podbean.com/media/player/36wgj-620d8c?from=yiiadmin

Download this episode (right click and save)


Source Passages

Homer Iliad 15.38-48, 176-220


Translation Sources

Homer. Iliad. Trans. Stanley Lombardo. Indianapolis: Hackett, 1997.


Selected Sources

NASA. “Neptune.” http://solarsystem.nasa.gov/planets/neptune


Shout Outs & Notes

Check out The Endless Knot (http://www.alliterative.net) podcast by Mark Sundaram and Aven McMaster.


Join us on Twitter @InnesAlison and @darrinsunstrum

Subscribe on iTunes so you don’t miss an episode! https://itunes.apple.com/ca/podcast/mythtake/id1103569489?mt=2

Google Play https://goo.gl/app/playmusic?ibi=com.google.PlayMusic&isi=691797987&ius=googleplaymusic&link=https://play.google.com/music/m/Iaegzaquhc7lfvc24icrzardzmu?t%3DMythTake

Find our RSS on Podbean http://alisoninnes.podbean.com

This week’s theme music: “Super Hero” by King Louie’s Missing Monuments from the album “Live at WFMU” (2011). Used under Creative Commons license. Music used under Creative Commons license and available from Free Music Archive.

mythtake episode 10 mythological tour of the solar system 7: uranus/ouranos

img_6482

This week we discuss the story of Ouranos, an early sky god in Greek mythology. Darrin ties it in to Frankenstein and Alison offers some summer reading recommendations for those wanting to geek out on history of astronomy. The cat also makes a guest appearance.

 

https://www.podbean.com/media/player/f6yv6-614869?from=yiiadmin

Download this episode (right click and save)


Summer Reading Recommendations

Richard Holmes. “The Age of Wonder: How the Romantic Generation Discovered the Beauty and Terror of Science.” Harper Press: 2008.

Richard Cohen. “Chasing the Sun: The Epic Story of the Star That Gives Us Life.” Simon & Schuster: 2010.


Source Passages

Hesiod Theogony 116-210.


Translation Sources

Hesiod. Theogony. Trans. Richard Caldwell & Stephanie Nelson. Newburyport MA: Focus Publishing, 2009.


Selected Sources

NASA. “Uranus.” http://solarsystem.nasa.gov/planets/uranus


Join us on Twitter @InnesAlison and @darrinsunstrum

Subscribe on iTunes so you don’t miss an episode! https://itunes.apple.com/ca/podcast/mythtake/id1103569489?mt=2

Google Play https://goo.gl/app/playmusic?ibi=com.google.PlayMusic&isi=691797987&ius=googleplaymusic&link=https://play.google.com/music/m/Iaegzaquhc7lfvc24icrzardzmu?t%3DMythTake

Find our RSS on Podbean http://alisoninnes.podbean.com

This week’s theme music: “Super Hero” by King Louie’s Missing Monuments from the album “Live at WFMU” (2011). Used under Creative Commons license. Music used under Creative Commons license and available from Free Music Archive.