“Humanizing a Monster: The Saddest Scene in Latin Literature” SENTENTIAE ANTIQUAE

How much of a monster is Polyphemus, really? Sententiae Antiquae challenges us to think more sympathetically.

As horrifying as his earlier behavior had been, and as menacing as his threats to repaint his walls with Odysseus’ blood may sound, this speech is nevertheless given in the context of a much more deeply humanizing emotion: Polyphemus’ solicitous concern for his ram. He knows these animals, and evinces a tender regard for their well-being even in the midst of his own suffering. Indeed, this affectionate concern for his ram serves as a stark counterpoint to the actions of Odysseus, who throughout the poem shows no apparent serious regard for his companions. At no point in the poem does Odysseus show any outward emotional attachment to his men, and it is notable that even in his own tale of his sufferings, the loss of his men is primarily framed as something which happened to him. Polyphemus is thus portrayed as being, despite his monstrous qualities, a more compassionate figure than Odysseus.

Source: Humanizing a Monster: The Saddest Scene in Latin Literature ‹ SENTENTIAE ANTIQUAE ‹ Reader — WordPress.com

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